Coronet

Architecture Residential Melbourne , Australia

Large jtan coronet010  edit web

Media Contact

21 Images

Want to download these images? Make sure you confirm usage rights with the BowerKit owner / contact person.

Small jtan coronet010  edit fullres

1.

Tom Ross

8532 px 5688 px 22 MB A3 print
Small jtan coronet025  edit fullres

2.

Tom Ross

8577 px 5718 px 24 MB A3 print
Small jtan coronet040  fullres

3.

Tom Ross

8688 px 5792 px 28 MB A3 print
Small jtan coronet047  fullres

4.

Tom Ross

5594 px 8392 px 30 MB A3 print
Small jtan coronet066  edit edit fullres

5.

Tom Ross

5730 px 8595 px 23 MB A3 print
Small jtan coronet066  edit fullres

6.

Tom Ross

5730 px 8595 px 23 MB A3 print
Small jtan coronet123  edit edit fullres

7.

Tom Ross

8544 px 5699 px 24 MB A3 print
Small jtan coronet133  edit fullres

8.

Tom Ross

8569 px 5712 px 28 MB A3 print
Small jtan coronet161  edit fullres

9.

Tom Ross

8688 px 5792 px 35 MB A3 print
Small jtan coronet188  edit fullres

10.

5597 px 8396 px 28 MB A3 print
Small jtan coronet197  edit fullres

11.

Tom Ross

8522 px 5685 px 26 MB A3 print
Small jtan coronet207  edit edit 2 fullres

12.

Tom Ross

6359 px 4239 px 7 MB A3 print
Small jtan coronet289  fullres

13.

Jos Tan

4242 px 4242 px 5 MB A4 print
Small jtan coronet298  edit fullres

14.

Tom Ross

4212 px 6317 px 9 MB A3 print
Small before

15. Rear of house before renovation

Colour version available. For privacy reasons, please do not publish without prior consent.

Jos Tan

1400 px 1400 px 262 KB Print - Low res only
Small before bathroom bw

16. Old bathroom

Colour version available. For privacy reasons, please do not publish without prior consent.

Jos Tan

1263 px 1894 px 134 KB Print - Low res only
Small before kitchen1 bw

17. Old kitchen

Colour version available. For privacy reasons, please do not publish without prior consent.

Jos Tan

2144 px 1424 px 296 KB Print - Low res only
Small before kitchen2 bw

18. Old kitchen

Colour version available. For privacy reasons, please do not publish without prior consent.

Jos Tan

1424 px 2144 px 267 KB Print - Low res only
Small before laundry bw

19. Old laundry

Colour version available. For privacy reasons, please do not publish without prior consent.

Jos Tan

1424 px 2144 px 312 KB Print - Low res only
Small coronet plans hires

20. Before and after floor plans

3831 px 2554 px 134 KB A4 print
Small coronet elevations hires

21. Before and after elevations

3551 px 3551 px 255 KB A4 print

Description

This brick home is one of a pair, built side-by-side c.1930. The brief was for a new bathroom and laundry, and a new kitchen and dining area that could entertain a large gathering while opening up to the backyard.

The first option we considered was to demolish the rear of the building to make way for a new addition, but it soon became apparent that the available budget would fall short of this plan. Instead, a decision was made to retain much of the existing brick structure, and pop out a small extension to the side.

This saved money in new structure and roofing while still allowing the entire back section to be reconfigured. We also liked how the home’s physical connection its twin next door was maintained. Bricks were salvaged from demolition, and re-used in the extension. In the bathroom, fittings and fixtures were located in former door openings to increase effective width while preserving a memory of house’s past.

One of our tenets is that bigger is not necessarily better. Witnessing the huge difference in function and amenity achieved through this compact renovation has been very rewarding, as was sharing our client’s joy in the reinvigorated space.

Questions and Answers

What was the brief?

The brief from the owner, a keen cook, was to create a new kitchen and dining area that could entertain a large gathering and open up to the backyard. The existing bathroom and external laundry were both also to be replaced with new.

Overall, what are you most happy with about the project?

The fact that retaining the shell of the building proved to be a successful strategy, and that we managed to get so much amenity out of such a small area.

How did you answer the brief? Any interesting or unusual design decisions that helped to fulfil the brief?

The owner initially envisaged that the rear of the house would be completely demolished for the new addition. We explored this option, but soon concluded that this would not be feasible with the available budget.

As an alternative, we proposed retaining most of the existing brick structure, demolishing the internal walls, and building a small extension out to the side. This saved money in new structure and roofing while still allowing the entire back section to be reconfigured. As a bonus, the home’s visual and physical connection with its twin next door would be maintained.

Basically, we found a way to create the required functional areas by staying within the existing building shell and designing a compact little addition rather than demolishing and building anew.

What are some of the materials/finishes you used?

We used Vic Ash for the flooring, benchtops, and reveals, and matching veneer for some of the cupboards. The benchtops, reveals, and timber joinery were stained to match. The timber species used for the outdoor deck, shed, and bench is Spotted Gum.

The kitchen splashback tiles are hand-made by Mutina in Italy. Bathroom tiles are a mix of matt glazed ceramic tiles and mosaics.

What were some of the challenges with the design and construction?

We only had just over 1.4m between the external brick wall and boundary to fit in a new bathroom. After taking wall thickness and finishes into account, we were left with less than 1.2m. That is a skinny bathroom.

To make it work, we located the vanity and fixtures within the alcoves left by the former door openings, providing enough usable space, and a nice feeling of depth. We also liked how the alcoves hinted at the history of the house and what used to be there.

A less glamorous challenge was fixing the stormwater system. The existing drainage system was dilapidated and not draining away from the building, compromising the long-term stability of the footings. As part of the works, a rainwater tank was added to collect runoff, with the overflow running properly away from the building and towards the legal point of discharge.

Details

Project size

35 m2

Site size

157 m2

Completion date

2017

Building levels

1

Project team

Tiny jos tan architects

Jos Tan Architects